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Poland plots course to top 20 in World Bank's Doing Business ranking – PM Ewa Kopacz

Wyślij Print Pobierz added: | 2014-11-02 10:49:19
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Poland’s PM Ewa Kopacz has said the country’s 32nd place in the World Bank’s ‘Doing Business 2015’ report is good but the nation will climb to a high place in the ranking next year after reforms.

Poland’s PM Ewa Kopacz has said the country’s 32nd place in the World Bank’s ‘Doing Business 2015’ report is good but the nation will climb to a high place in the ranking next year after reforms. Poland advanced in this year's edition of World Bank's Doing Business Report to the 32nd place from 45th last year, thus securing the highest position in the report's history. Poland gained thanks to new methodology applied by the World Bank, rather than thanks to positive system changes, the daily Puls Biznesu wrote. If the new methodology were applied last year, Poland would then secure the 30th place.
Even if Poland, as measured exclusively in Warsaw by the World Bank, slipped two spots to 32rd place against an adjusted prior-year ranking even it cut its nominal distance to the world's pro-business leaders. The distance-to-frontier score edged up to 73.56 pps from 73.36 pps in 2014, the report showed and said that a reform slate can launch the nation to the world's top 20 next year.
The yearly ranking by the World Bank measures the ease of doing business in 189 economies based on 11 business-related regulations, which include the ease in which businesses can be set up, the availability of business loans and trading across borders. "The result is pleasing but not fully satisfying considering our ambitions," Kopacz said Wednesday upon the presentation of the ranking. "We are determined to keep on improving conditions for the functioning of firms. Next year I'd like Poland to find itself in the top 20 of the ranking."
Kopacz's planned rise in the rankings should come on implementation of a new tax law, rejigged regulations on business activity and acceleration of works on the new construction law, all underway following strong policy vows in her inaugural policy speech.
Of the 10 "Doing Business" ranking topics, Poland enjoyed growth in only two: trading across borders and enforcing contracts, and noted no change in two other categories: registering property and protecting minority investors.
Still, Poland proved one of 21 economies that introduced reforms making it easier to do business in 3 or more of the 10 topics, the report showed. Those three areas included: easier access to electricity, property registration and cross-border trade.
In terms of electricity, the Warsaw utility revised the fee structure for new connections in ways that reduced the cost for new customers, the report reads.
In terms of property registration, Poland introduced online procedures and reduced notary fees.
In terms of foreign trade, Poland improved port procedures by launching a new terminal operating system at the port of Gdansk.